Deconstructing Hysteria: Integrating Concepts of Neuroinflammation into Integrative Pain Management

Complex Regional Pain Syndrome (CRPS) is associated with unusual movement disorders, somatovisceral dysfunctions, and non-dermatomal patterns of pain. These symptoms have often been viewed by neurologists and psychiatrists as psychogenic in origin. In contrast, recent neuroimaging and immunologic studies in CRPS and other disorders have revealed important linkages between neuroinflammation, neuroautoimmune attack, and chronic pain, autonomic dysfunction, and movement disorders.  These findings suggest that neuroinflammatory lesions, as well as their associated functional pathologies, should be incorporated into the differential diagnosis of non-dermatomal pain presentations, atypical movement disorders, as well as other “medically unexplained symptoms,” which have often been attributed to psychogenic illness.  

Faculty: Peter A. Moskovitz, MD and Mark Cooper, PhD

Target Audience

This 1-hour CME activity is designed for all clinicians who treat chronic pain. 

Learning Objectives

Upon completion of this activity, participants should be better able to:

  1. Identify three key features of neuroinflammatory disorders that could be misinterpreted as diagnosis criteria for "psychogenic illness.”
  2. Describe how neuroimaging methods can detect neuroinflammation and how they can be used in clinical practice.
  3. Discuss how the pain, perceptual disorders, and movement disorders in CRPS link it to other painful condition.
Pricing
Member$0.00
Non-Member$25.00
Course summary
Available credit: 
  • 1.00 AMA PRA Category 1 Credit(s)™
  • 1.00 APA
  • 1.00 Document of Attendance
  • 1.00 Nursing Credit
Course opens: 
01/05/2016
Course expires: 
01/05/2019
Cost:
$0.00
Rating: 
0

Peter A. Moskovitz, MD, is a clinical professor of orthopaedic surgery and neurological surgery at George Washington University in Washington, DC, where he continues a clinical practice begun in 1974. He chairs the board of directors of RSDSA, a non-profit support, advocacy, education, and research organization for the complex regional pain syndrome (CRPS) community. His published articles span topics from spine care to the theory and practice of pain mangement, including the neurobiology of experience and awareness, particularly of the experience of health and illness and of suffering evoked by pain. His current research includes a 20-year study of the health effects of CRPS.

Mark S. Cooper, PhD, is an associate professor at the University of Washington, where he studies connections between neuroinflammation, pain, and movement disorders.  Dr. Cooper is a member of the board of directors of the Reflex Sympathetic Dystrophy Syndrome Association.  He also serves on the medical advisory board of the Spasmodic Torticollis Association.  Dr. Cooper has been a Presidential Young Investigator of the National Science Foundation, and a neuroscience fellow of the Alfred P. Sloan Foundation. 

Staff and Content Validation Reviewer Disclosures

The staff involved with this activity and any content validation reviewers of this activity have reported no relevant financial relationships with commercial interests.

Planning Committee/Faculty Disclosure
Dr. Moskovitz reports that he has nothing to disclose.

Dr. Cooper reports that he receives salary, royalties and holds intellectual property rights/patent holder from the University of Washington, and receives grant or research support from Washington Research Foundation and National Spasmodic Torticollis Association.

Debra Nelson-Hogan, Director of Education for the Academy of Integrative Pain Management, reports that she has nothing to disclose.

Cathleen Coneghen, Assistant Director of Education for the Academy of Integrative Pain Management, reports that she has nothing to disclose.


Disclaimer
The information provided at this activity is for continuing education purposes only and is not meant to substitute for the independent medical judgment of a health care provider relative to diagnostic and treatment options of a specific patient’s medical condition.

For questions regarding CME for this activity, you may reach the department of education at the Academy of Integrative Pain Management at education@integrativepain.org.

For successful completion of this activity, please complete a pre-test; utilize the audio recordings synched with the presentation slides to review the content, providing answers to your questions as necessary; and complete a post-test and evaluation following the activity. You will then be prompted to print your certificate. This activity should take approximately 60 minutes to complete.

This program is accredited for physicians, nurses, and psychologists. All other clinicians can submit the certificate of attendance upon completion of the program to their licensing boards for consideration of credit.

Physicians

The American Academy of Pain Management is accredited by the Accreditation Council for Continuing Medical Education to provide continuing medical education for physicians.
The American Academy of Pain Management designates this educational activity for a maximum of 1 AMA PRA Category 1 Credit™. Physicians should only claim credit commensurate with the extent of their participation in the activity.

Nurses

The American Academy of Pain Management is approved by the California Board of Registered Nursing, Provider Number CEP 15881 for 1 contact hour.

Psychologists

The American Academy of Pain Management is approved by the American Psychological Association to sponsor continuing education for psychologists. The American Academy of Pain Management maintains responsibility for this program and its content.

The Academy designates this activity for a maximum of 1 CE credit.

Available Credit

  • 1.00 AMA PRA Category 1 Credit(s)™
  • 1.00 APA
  • 1.00 Document of Attendance
  • 1.00 Nursing Credit

Accreditation Period

Course opens: 
01/05/2016
Course expires: 
01/05/2019

Price

Cost:
$0.00
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